We have a roof! And windows!

Before we knew it, it was already September and many of our weekend days were booked up for the next two months with birthday celebrations and various engagements. We tried to make up some of that time by having Mike stay on the island during the week so we could work on the house after work. In case you’re wondering, yes, it was terrible working on the house after a day’s work with our real jobs. But, we had to keep things moving if we wanted to get the roof on before rainy season kicked into high gear.

Over the next few weekends, we installed the roof sheathing and tar paper. Working on the gable side of the house always got done pretty quick. But, when it came time to do any work on the bedroom loft roof, everything slowed way down and left us with plenty of room for little measurement mistakes due to the complexity of the design.

First row of roof sheathing installed on the gable roof side.
First row of roof sheathing installed on the gable roof side.
Before installing the roof sheathing over the bedroom loft, we put in foam insulation in some of the small gaps that would be impossible to get to once the plywood was attached.
Before installing the roof sheathing over the bedroom loft, we put in foam insulation in some of the small gaps that would be impossible to get to once the plywood was attached.

 

Half of the house water-proofed!
Half of the house water-proofed!

 

Finishing up the roof sheathing over the bedroom loft.
Finishing up the roof sheathing over the bedroom loft.

 

Roof water-proofing done just in time for another round of rain and wind!
Roof water-proofing done just in time for another round of rain and wind!

 

We then began preparing to install the metal roof which meant we had to get some of the trim pieces on first. I decided to go with a dark gray paint for the trim.

Painting some of the longer trim boards.
Painting some of the longer trim boards.

 

Installed trim on eave over door.
Installed trim on eave over door.

 

Once the trim on the eave was completed, we could finally start installing the metal roof. I decided to go with 29 gauge Ultra-Panel. It’s a bit more of a process to install than Snap-Loc, but it’s less expensive and also weighs less because it is a thinner gauge. This part went pretty smoothly. Although, again, quite a bit more work was put into the area above the bedroom loft.

Finishing up one side of the gable roof.
Finishing up one side of the gable roof.
We cut most of the metal roofing by hand. We tried renting two different electric metal shears to try to speed up the process, but neither of them worked well in this application due to the deep ridges in the metal panels.
We cut most of the metal roofing by hand. We tried renting two different electric metal shears to try to speed up the process, but neither of them worked well in this application due to the deep ridges in the metal panels.

 

Some of the corner pieces had to be cut and bent by hand as well.
Some of the corner pieces had to be cut and bent by hand as well.

 

Starting on the bedroom loft roof.
Starting on the bedroom loft roof.

 

Gettin er done.
Gettin er done.

 

Dang. That's a sweet looking roof!
Dang. That’s a sweet looking roof!

 

Installing the ridge - the last major piece of the roof.
Installing the ridge – the last major piece of the roof.

 

Night and rain settled in as Mike attached some of the final pieces.
Night and rain settled in as Mike attached some of the final pieces.

 

Next came the windows. Windows were one of the very first purchases I made after the trailer. Since you have to build the frame of the windows into the frame of the house, you need to know very early on what size your windows are going to be. To save on cost, I looked for windows at salvage stores and was able to find half of my windows at Second Use in Sodo. This saved me a TON of money and not to mention it allowed me to reuse something that already existed instead of consuming another new product.

Installing some expensive stuff called FlexWrap to keep water from getting into the frame of the house.
Installing some expensive stuff called FlexWrap to keep water from getting into the frame of the house.

 

 

All windows are installed and done!
All windows are installed and done!

Author: Debora Schwartz

I am a traveler, a writer, an outdoor enthusiast and a tiny house dweller.

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